Archive - September 2015

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Extra Extra
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Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure
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Contractor License Overview – With a Twist

Extra Extra

All Claims for Construction Defects in Residential Construction Sold on or after January 1, 2003 are Subject to Requirements and Procedures of the Right to Repair Act (SB 800)

McMillin Albany LLC v. Super Ct. 2015 F069370 (Cal.App. 5 Dist.)

By: Richard H. Glucksman, Jon A. Turigliatto, and David A. Napper
September 8, 2015
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In a particularly dramatic and noteworthy fashion and breaking with the Fourth Appellate District and rejecting the holding in Liberty Mut. Ins. Co. v. Brookfield Crystal Cove LLC (2013) 219 Cal.App.4th 98, the Fifth District Court of Appeal held that the California Legislature intended that all claims arising out of defects in new residential construction sold on or after January 1, 2003 are subject to the standards and requirements of the Right to Repair Act, commonly referred to as SB800, including specifically the requirement that notice be provided to the builder prior to filing a lawsuit.  Thus, SB 800 is the exclusive remedy for all defect claims arising out of new residential construction sold on or after January 1, 2003.

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Disclosure, Disclosure, Disclosure

A Brief Reflection Regarding the Trend Towards Heightened Disclosure Requirements in Real Property Transactions

By: Richard H. Glucksman, Jon A. Turigliatto, and David A. Napper
September 1, 2015
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A brief reflection regarding the trend towards heightened disclosure requirements in real property transactions including the recent case of Wong v. Stoler (2015 WL 3862525), where the seller’s failure to disclose private sewer line resulted in rescission of the contract.

In a very recently published opinion in a real property disclosure case, the First District Court of Appeal in Wayson Wong v. Ira Stoler (2015 WL 3862525), held that the trial court declined to effectuate a rescission of the contract based on incorrect justifications and that its alternative remedy failed to provide the purchasers with the complete relief to which they were entitled.

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Contractor License Overview – With a Twist

By: Richard H. Glucksman, Jon A. Turigliatto, and David A. Napper
September 1, 2015
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The California Contractors State License Board provides licenses to contractors and regulates the state’s construction activity. The California Business and Profession (“B&P”) Code Section 7031 prohibits unlicensed contractors from bringing or maintaining an action to recover compensation in any court in the state of California. Section 7031 also addresses, amongst other issues, recovery from an unlicensed contractor and when proof of licensure is required in a civil suit. In order to recover in a civil action, a contractor must allege that he or she was a duly licensed contractor at all times during the performance of that act or contract, regardless of the merits of the cause of action brought by the person. Section 7031 protects consumers who enter into agreements with contractors and promotes the public policy of having licensed, competent, and honest builders. See Montgomery Sansome LP v. Rezai (2012) 204 Cal.App.4th 786. However as further examined by the recent case of Art Womack v. David Angus Lovell et al. (2015) WL 3658066, Section 7031 also protects the builders and contractors from cagey pleading practices by Plaintiff homeowners.

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